August 2007


Cory Doctorow writes, over at Boing Boing:

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America has used the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to fraudulently remove numerous non-infringing works from Scribd, a site that allows the general public to share text files with one another in much the same way that Flickr allows its users to share pictures.

Included in the takedown were: a junior high teacher’s bibliography of works that will excite children about reading sf, the back-catalog of a magazine called Ray Gun Revival, books by other authors who have never authorized SFWA to act on their behalf, such as Bruce Sterling, and my own Creative Commons-licensed novel, “Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom.”

I’m not a SFWA member, mainly because I don’t yet qualify. But even if I were, they are not authorized to claim copyright of my work in their attempts to serve DMCA notices on my behalf. Just… no.

And I should be writing critiques.

I’ll be adding to the collection over the weekend… unless my camera is dead.

Registration

I read this ages ago, but haven’t written about it here. Well, work is keeping me crazy, and my short fiction turnarounds are insane, so…

This was a very enjoyable read. I liked part one, “The Wreck of the Mary Byrd,” the best. It just appealed to me the most, structurally. I was particularly taken with the first person character introductions, where everyone explained who they were and what they were doing aboard the Mary Byrd. My favorite chapter was Chapter II, Laura Brown’s chapter, partly for the use of dialect (I tried to read part of it aloud to Brian and found myself unable to do so without a southern accent), and partly because–I admit it–I just identified with Laura’s intense hatred of the cold. (I got seasonal affective disorder in southern Virginia.)

Anyway, it was mainly the history and the voices in part one that appealed to me, although there’s also a werewolf-hunting Irish nun. Parts two and three feel a little pasted on to me, but I like part one and the history in all of them enough to overlook that. My parents met singing opera. I’ll overlook a lot if you appeal to my ear enough.

Good book. Go, read.

Summaries are hard. Let’s do math rebuild a RAID array instead!

I think most of the people who regularly read this blog have already read this series, but for those of you who haven’t…
I love these books to complete irrational distraction, and if you haven’t read them, you should! I should probably tell you to read them for wonderful characters, clever plot twists, compelling settings, and delightful first-person voices, but I won’t, even though they have all that (and they make my ear very happy). No, I’m biased, so I’m going to tell you to read them for Mouse.
I get terrible crushes on fictional characters. It’s my way. There are lots of characters in these books that I love, including Page and the Dragon, but I adore Mouse in that special, all characters are judged by how they treat Mouse way. Therefore, I expect everyone else to love him just as much as I do.
Brian and I even agree on characters, which is a first.