October 2005


I don’t think I’m going to finish the cliché story in time to send it to Scalzi. I’m barfy, and the story isn’t finished. At this point, the story lacks conflict, and it just kind of stops rather than ends. I think it’s salvageable, just not by tomorrow.
The business trip gave me an idea that I think is flash. It would qualify for the cliché challenge if it was SF, but it’s fantasy. But I must commemorate that dire discussion this way so I didn’t waste half an hour of my life before I walked out. That, and it’s stuck in my head.

The first story in the one story a week plan is done, and let me tell you, it’s just not right. 😉
Alas, no, it is not the cliché story. I thought I would have more luck with that one next week, while I’m out of town and bored. I’ve never actually written aliens before, and thought it would take more time then I had this week. No, this week I wrote another nightmare, only it popped out as 2100 words in three days. If my subconscious feels compelled to taunt me with this sort of thing, clearly I need to recycle.
Operation Workout also proceeds apace. W00t!
Lo, I should be in bed.

This may be more like it. It’s Jay Lake’s “one story a week” rules. In short:
1) Write a story every week.
2) Finish everything you start.
3) Don’t self-critique while you’re writing.
4) Work on one thing at a time.
The only thing that may not work for me is “Work on one story at a time.” I like to punish stories that aren’t working by making them stand in the corner while I work on another one. On the other hand, he probably does have a point about slogging through them making you a better writer. Hmm.
I already follow his shadow rule: Keep stories in the mail. I’m firmly against letting them hang around the house drinking all my beer. I try to turn them around in 24 hours or less.

Um, yeah. 9pm is apparently too late. Also, I apparently need a wordcount. There’s that wacky time when I get home, while dinner is cooking; I’d be fresher then.
The Athlete’s Diary convinces me that I need to modify the Motivational Spreadsheet of Doom to handle daily wordcount (it’s intended for large projects). There’s something about looking back over documentation of your efforts that’s incredibly encouraging.
It’s also possible that the problem is that this story isn’t ready to be written. But it’s for Scalzi’s cliche challenge, and therefore needs to be done and sent by November 1. *shakes fist at story*
It’s also possible that this is a problem that requires the application of more diet coke. 😉

Every day at 9pm, except Fridays because that’s Battlestar Galactica, there will be fiction. I can brainstorm, outline, edit, write first drafts, etc., but there will be fiction at 9pm, and I must spend an hour on this. The me has spoken.
I considered a daily wordcount, and… not yet. Let’s see how the first week goes. Especially since, well, I keep starting the cliché story, and keep discarding drafts. Right now I think I have the wrong protagonist/POV character. Hmmmmm.

Because I was having trouble convincing myself to work out, I decided to set my alarm clock half an hour earlier and work out in the mornings. This prompted much mirth from the SO, since my usual morning routine has been to hit the snooze button for an hour. Jokes about ejector buttons and dynamite are common.
I had the idea that perhaps if it was at a specific time, I would do it. My “when I get home from work, unless I’m hungry, because then I have to eat and let it settle” schedule wasn’t cutting it.
Well, this is the first week’s stats, not counting Saturday’s scheduled workouts:
Exercise bike: 3.4 hours, 37 virtual miles, average pace: 10.8 mph.
Weights: 4 workouts.
Lunchtime walks: 2, 0.4 hours, approximate distance: 1 mile.
Words written: 0.
I really hate the word “schedule,” but I think this suggests that I need a daily writing appointment with myself. Perhaps Friday should be a day off, since I watch all of Sci Friday’s lineup. There must be Battlestar Galactica.
I think I’ll come up with a plan–time, minimum wordcount (if any), etc.–and start Monday.

The illustration is terribly cute. Go, look!

I try to stay vaguely on topic, and stick to geekgrrl and writing things. (Maybe that’s a mistake!) But this blog is astonishing. It’s maintained by a photographer, and he’s telling the story of Hurricane Katrina’s impact on Pearlington, MS, his mother’s home. The portraits of the survivors are some of the most moving things I’ve ever seen. Seriously. It’s almost like Dorothea Lange photoblogging Katrina. Or, as the author, Clayton James Cubitt, says, “I normally shoot fashion and portraiture for magazine and advertising clients. I’m often called upon to make celebrities look heroic. Celebrities aren’t heroic. These survivors are. I wanted to make portraits of them that showed their pride, and dignity, and strength, even in such low circumstances. I wanted to show my respect, and love.”
Operation Eden. Go.